(Above: XOXO attendees visiting the herd last year.) This year, there’s no inside access for insurance reasons, but just about every goat will come to the fence for scratches. Please don’t bring them any outside food; anything growing around them is fine, as are leaves this big wind has been blowing up against the fence. FWIW, many of the goats have increased their ratings on the “friendliness scale” since the sign at the gate was created; none are “mean”, as it’s a scale of sociability not aggression. Owners or caretakers will be around intermittently Thursday through Sunday, with a specific commitment to have people on-site Saturday and Sunday from 12-2pm and 5-7pm. And thanks as always to the gracious and patient approach of Killian Pacific, owners of the property, allowing us this final month to prepare our new home, and let us be around for XOXO again this year. Enjoy! (And remember: hashtag #belmontgoats!)

(Above: XOXO attendees visiting the herd last year.) This year, there’s no inside access for insurance reasons, but just about every goat will come to the fence for scratches. Please don’t bring them any outside food; anything growing around them is fine, as are leaves this big wind has been blowing up against the fence. FWIW, many of the goats have increased their ratings on the “friendliness scale” since the sign at the gate was created; none are “mean”, as it’s a scale of sociability not aggression. Owners or caretakers will be around intermittently Thursday through Sunday, with a specific commitment to have people on-site Saturday and Sunday from 12-2pm and 5-7pm. And thanks as always to the gracious and patient approach of Killian Pacific, owners of the property, allowing us this final month to prepare our new home, and let us be around for XOXO again this year. Enjoy! (And remember: hashtag #belmontgoats!)

Above are the rough layout and footage requirements for fencing at the new location in Lents Town Center. We’d meant to begin construction on the fence two weeks ago, but as that didn’t happen our intended schedule has slipped a bit.
Here’s where you, perhaps, come in.
While we’ve been collecting and comparing quotes from various local fence contractors (we’d really rather go local than use a service from, say, a “big box” chain), we’re going to publicly outline the rough specs and options in the hopes the one of two things might come to pass.
1) You might have a personal connection to a local fence contractor that might be excited to be a part of this ongoing story of “nature in the neighborhood”.
or
2) You yourself might have personal and/or professional experience installing a chain-link fence and would be willing to help guide us through a do-it-yourself installation if that’s the way we need to go.
Our initial contractor was going to donate the labor, significantly reducing our costs, because they were interested in what we’ve been doing. If we have to pay market rates for both materials and labor, a significant portion of the proceeds from our recent crowdfunder might need to be allocated to make up the difference between the available grant money tied to the land and the fence costs.
If at all possible, we’d like to avoid that. If necessary, we’ll do so by purchasing materials only and installing the fence ourselves, with some expert help.
To be clear: we don’t believe we somehow are entitled to a “donated labor” or other such cost-saving deal; we simply feel it’d be fiscally irresponsible if we didn’t do everything we could to see if there were such a deal out there to be had.
So, here’s what we’re looking for in terms of the fence itself. We’re looking at a number of different possible scenarios.
1) Regular galvanized chain-link for the entire fence, either 11-gauge or 9-gauge. As you probably know, goats like to rub up against the fence and so we want to consider the thicker gauge, depending on the cost difference.
2) Splitting the fence between regular galvanized and black-coated chain-link, the latter along the more public-fronting segments (e.g. SE 91st and SE Reedway) to present a better face to our surrounding neighbors. An alternate version of this option also uses the black-coated along the southern edge of the parking lot, since that’s a fairly visible segment.
The entire fence is six feet high, with a single gate set in the 24’ diagonal segment.
An important note: We are not constructing a “back” fence along the eastern portion because the Lents Masonic Lodge has a six-foot fence along the property line already. We are not allowed to directly tie into or physically connect to their posts, and so instead will just need to get as close as possible with our own. Should we go the D.I.Y. route, this last point is one of the crucial reasons why we’d like to find amongst you a fence expert so we can pull that off without negatively impacting the Masons’ fence.
As you know, The Belmont Goats has tremendous community support and public attention, and has received significant press over the past six months alone. In addition, our social media network includes over 1,000 followers on Twitter, over 2,500 likes on Facebook, nearly 900 followers on Instagram, and nearly 6,000 followers on Vine. It is our hope that there is a local fence contractor who will see this as an opportunity.
Otherwise, we at least hope to prevail upon any experts among you to whom we could turn for guidance should we need to install the fence ourselves.
Any leads should be sent to us via email as soon as possible. To reiterate: at this stage we primarily are looking either for personal connections to fence contractors, or your own personal/professional experience with fence construction.
As always, we thank everyone for their continued support. Whether we find a new contractor that doesn’t bust our budget, or go the D.I.Y. route, we look forward to getting the relocation underway and beginning the next phase of The Belmont Goats together with you.

Above are the rough layout and footage requirements for fencing at the new location in Lents Town Center. We’d meant to begin construction on the fence two weeks ago, but as that didn’t happen our intended schedule has slipped a bit.

Here’s where you, perhaps, come in.

While we’ve been collecting and comparing quotes from various local fence contractors (we’d really rather go local than use a service from, say, a “big box” chain), we’re going to publicly outline the rough specs and options in the hopes the one of two things might come to pass.

1) You might have a personal connection to a local fence contractor that might be excited to be a part of this ongoing story of “nature in the neighborhood”.

or

2) You yourself might have personal and/or professional experience installing a chain-link fence and would be willing to help guide us through a do-it-yourself installation if that’s the way we need to go.

Our initial contractor was going to donate the labor, significantly reducing our costs, because they were interested in what we’ve been doing. If we have to pay market rates for both materials and labor, a significant portion of the proceeds from our recent crowdfunder might need to be allocated to make up the difference between the available grant money tied to the land and the fence costs.

If at all possible, we’d like to avoid that. If necessary, we’ll do so by purchasing materials only and installing the fence ourselves, with some expert help.

To be clear: we don’t believe we somehow are entitled to a “donated labor” or other such cost-saving deal; we simply feel it’d be fiscally irresponsible if we didn’t do everything we could to see if there were such a deal out there to be had.

So, here’s what we’re looking for in terms of the fence itself. We’re looking at a number of different possible scenarios.

1) Regular galvanized chain-link for the entire fence, either 11-gauge or 9-gauge. As you probably know, goats like to rub up against the fence and so we want to consider the thicker gauge, depending on the cost difference.

2) Splitting the fence between regular galvanized and black-coated chain-link, the latter along the more public-fronting segments (e.g. SE 91st and SE Reedway) to present a better face to our surrounding neighbors. An alternate version of this option also uses the black-coated along the southern edge of the parking lot, since that’s a fairly visible segment.

The entire fence is six feet high, with a single gate set in the 24’ diagonal segment.

An important note: We are not constructing a “back” fence along the eastern portion because the Lents Masonic Lodge has a six-foot fence along the property line already. We are not allowed to directly tie into or physically connect to their posts, and so instead will just need to get as close as possible with our own. Should we go the D.I.Y. route, this last point is one of the crucial reasons why we’d like to find amongst you a fence expert so we can pull that off without negatively impacting the Masons’ fence.

As you know, The Belmont Goats has tremendous community support and public attention, and has received significant press over the past six months alone. In addition, our social media network includes over 1,000 followers on Twitter, over 2,500 likes on Facebook, nearly 900 followers on Instagram, and nearly 6,000 followers on Vine. It is our hope that there is a local fence contractor who will see this as an opportunity.

Otherwise, we at least hope to prevail upon any experts among you to whom we could turn for guidance should we need to install the fence ourselves.

Any leads should be sent to us via email as soon as possible. To reiterate: at this stage we primarily are looking either for personal connections to fence contractors, or your own personal/professional experience with fence construction.

As always, we thank everyone for their continued support. Whether we find a new contractor that doesn’t bust our budget, or go the D.I.Y. route, we look forward to getting the relocation underway and beginning the next phase of The Belmont Goats together with you.